Posts Tagged ‘cellular’

Roots of Rhythm X- Part 1

June 23, 2015

I’m often asked questions about my process so whenever I start a new piece, I try to make a commitment to document it along the way…and usually fail.

BUT the piece I just finished, Roots of Rhythm X was happily an exception. So, if you’re interested, here are a series of posts looking at the steps to its creation. This piece was under construction for the better part of two months.

Part 1

After sketching out some rough ideas and making some critical color decisions (documenting that step would involve many pictures of me pawing through piles of dyed silk and looking discouraged and lost), I chose the violet background silk, fused it onto a piece of Warm and Natural batting cut a few inches smaller. I then couched varigated yarn to build the cellular grid.

Roots of Rhythm X: step 1

Roots of Rhythm X: step 1

When the grid was done, inner shapes were added. This red/rust silk is all one color. The variation comes from light catching the nap of the charmeuse at different angles.

Roots of Rhythm X: step 2

Roots of Rhythm X: step 2

…till all spaces were filled. I then stitched around each red/rust shape.

Roots of Rhythm X: step 2

Roots of Rhythm X: step 2

Please let me know if you have more specific questions about these steps.
Stay tuned for more…

Small mounted felted creation #2

February 17, 2015

Roots of Rhythm VIII
I continued to explore the Roots of Rhythm motif with this one but skewed the orientation to a diagonal and included a section of 3D elements.

This piece is 11.5″ square and is mounted onto a 14″ x 14″ x 1.5″” black gallery wrapped stretched canvas. This  will appear on my website soon and will be offered for $450 with free shipping. Let me know if you’re interested!

Roots of Rhythm VIII

Roots of Rhythm VIII

And here’s a close up:

Roots of Rhythm VIII -detail

Roots of Rhythm VIII -detail

Smaller mounted felted creation #1

February 13, 2015

About 6 weeks ago, I wrote that I was exploring new felting techniques and had decided to focus on creating smaller work using all that newly dyed felted wool and silk. I’m very glad I went this route. Working small allows me to try out new compositional  ideas or extend older ones. Each finished piece ended up about 11-12″ square and was then mounted onto a 14″ x 14″ x 1.5″” black gallery wrapped  stretched canvas. I created four pieces using felt and silk from the same dye baths- in colors I had chosen because I felt they’d work sensationally together. Having a restricted pallette freed me up to really concentrate on texture and composition.

These new pieces will appear on my website soon. They will each be offered for $450 with free shipping. Let me know if you’re interested in owning one!

I’m going to introduce each of these pieces one by one in a series of posts.

#1  Roots Of Rhythm VII

Roots of Rhythm VII

Roots of Rhythm VII

This zoomed in detail may give you a better sense of why I’m in love with working with the rich textures possible when wool and silk have a serious felting relationship!

Roots of Rhythm VII- detail

Roots of Rhythm VII- detail

For several years, I worked on a series called Roots of Rhythm-the title borrowed from a Paul Simon lyric which worked for me on many different levels:

“These are the roots of rhythm and the roots of rhythm remain.”

This new piece further explores cellular structures dancing with various forces and rhythms.

 

 

Cultivating Connections II

November 25, 2014

My newest piece continues my exploration of combining various raised felted textures with richly shimmery silk charmeuse. The original seeds for this composition were images of purkinje cells-some of the largest neurons in our brains. They have fantastic branching dendrites.
Maybe my fascination with how these tiny connections in our brains basically enable us to do or think anything has to do with my growing awareness that my own aging brain’s connections aren’t always so reliable!

Cultivating Connections II

Cultivating Connections II
31″ x 44″ (approx.)

Zooming in:

Cultivating Connections II detail 1

Cultivating Connections II detail 1

Cultivating Connections II detail 2

Cultivating Connections II detail 2

 

Felting 3D Cells Using Resists

December 8, 2013

While waiting for my newest piece, Worlds Apart, to be photographed so I can share it, I’m launching into my next piece. I have this crazy idea to felt individual “cells” that will have openings created by felting around a resist. If you’re into felting you know there are endless 3D objects that can be made using this technique-vessels, bowls, slippers or fantastical creatures like those made by Andrea Graham (whose work I love)!

I’m already incorporating different ways to create more raised, bas relief texture, like here:

felting texture

felting texture

-so I figure, “why not take it a step further?”

I first cut non-adhesive “foam shelf-liner” (I love hardware stores) into the cellular shapes adding about 30% for shrinkage. These will be the resists to create an inside space within each “cell”.

cutting out the resist shapes

cutting out the resist shapes

Dyed wool batting was applied on both sides of each resist with extra around the sides to fold over and seal the edges. I’m a beginner at this resist business so this step was not smooth…

laying out the wool on the resist

laying out the wool on the resist

But I finally figured out a way to get the pesky fibers to obey me.

wool laid on both sides of resist

wool laid on both sides of resist

Then came the usual felting routine-netting, hot soapy water, lots of massaging. I then rolled the three cells I made in a towel bundle, velcro strapped it and tumbled in a cool dryer. I really dislike all the rolling involved in felting and so have been overjoyed to find the dryer method! So after four rebundlings and retumblings, felting had been achieved and I could cut the cell opening and pull out the resist.

resist out and cut

resist out and cut

Woo hoo it worked! And I (surprisingly) put the purple wool in the correct place so it would be the color of the inside! Here are the three after much fulling and shaping-still wet:

finished wet cells

finished wet cells

I’m very happy with the results and my mind is abuzz with ideas to incorporate lots of these babies in to a piece of art! What will I do with those lovely openings?! Stay tuned.